Slave is A Class, Not A Color

“Every king springs from a race of slaves, and every slave had kings among his ancestors.” (Plato)

In 1863 and 1864, eight former slaves toured the northern states to raise money for impoverished African-American schools in New Orleans; four white children were deliberately included to evoke sympathy from white northerners. Photographs of Charles Taylor, Rebecca Huger, Rosina Downs, and Augusta Broujey were mass-produced and sold as part of the campaign.
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For further reading on these children, see White Slaves by Celia Caust-Ellenbogen and Visualizing the Color Line by Carol Goodman.

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5 thoughts on “Slave is A Class, Not A Color

  1. Isaac White the little boy pictured in the photo of White and Colored slaves is my Great grandfather. His father James White arrived in New Orleans aboard the slave ship Victorine on Dec. 13,1843, as part of a manifest that consisted of 22 slaves. He is listed on line 13 as being 23 years old and 6 ft. tall. The 1870 census list them living together in Union County, Arkansas in the Johnson Township. James White died in 1915 and his son Isaac White died on December 28, 1927. I would love to introduce you to Isaac White’s family he is my Grandmother’s father.
    Look forward to communicating with you. Thanks Ben

      • My pleasure to share and it took lots of research to find photo. I also have a photo of my Great, Great grandfather (James) and the manifest from the slave ship that he arrived in New Orleans aboard. In 1880 living in his household is what makes up Tri -Racial America. Isaac (Black), Annie (Indian),Daniel’s Joe (White). I have pictures of each one of them and you can tell what race or national origin they belong to.

          • From Western Africa my DNA shows me to be 87% African (Cameroon/Congo)33% Nigeria (17%) Benin/Togo (10%) Mali (9%) Ivory Coast/Ghana) 5%) 1% America (that would be Native American) 12% Europe My research verifies these estimates

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