Divorced Woman Shares 4 Ways She Killed Her Marriage

1. She emasculated him all the time – She spoke about him to her friends in a demeaning manner. She would complain about him all the time and tell her girlfriends about the things that he did that she thought were wrong or things that he didn’t do. Sometimes she would do this in front of him leaving him feeling hurt and embarrassed. She said that she treated him like he was a child sometimes. He eventually began to pull away and she began looking for every little fault that she could find.

Read the other 3 HERE.



Polygyny Legalization & Women’s Inheritance: An African Response to Homophilic Marriage Legalization Pressures

Kenyan President Signs Polygyny Law

It brings civil law, where a man was only allowed one wife, into line with customary law, where some cultures allow multiple partners.  It allows men to take more wives without consulting existing spouses.  It has abolished the practice of unofficial traditional marriages which were never registered and could be ended without any legal divorce proceedings.  Kenyans now have to be 18 to marry and this applies to all cultures.  The law now allows for equal property and inheritance rights – previously a woman had to prove her contribution to the couple’s wealth.

“Through polygamous marriages women in precolonial Africa often had greater personal autonomy. As new wives joined a compound, older ones could focus on their trading. And successful women traders, such as the Iyalodes in Yorubaland, had a lot of power. While autonomous female traders are traditionally linked to West Africa, studies have found a long history of women’s trading also in places such as among the Kikuyu in Kenya as well as groups in Uganda and Zambia.

Of course, whatever autonomy polygamy afforded back then, it was subsumed by colonialism and the rise of puritanical missionary teaching.”

“That is not to say that married life was all that mattered to women, or that polygamy didn’t come with advantages for women, like independent trading, finances and legal rights.

Read more at:  http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-27206590

Actress Defends “Submissive Role” with NHL Hubbie

Former Full House Star Candace Cameron Bure writes “I love that my man is a leader. I want him to lead and be the head of our family.”

“Those major decisions do fall on him, but it doesn’t mean I don’t voice my opinion or have an opinion, I absolutely do.”

But, ultimately, her husband gets the final say. “It is very difficult to have two heads of authority,” Bure explained. “It doesn’t work in military, it doesn’t work — I mean, you have one president, you know what I’m saying?”

She further explained: “We are equal in our . . . importance, but we are just different in our performances within our marriage.”


How the Woman/Man Ratio Affects Sex, Facial Hair, and Politics

In the 1970s, a Harvard psychologist proposed that the ratio of men to women shapes culture and politics. Her theory predicts U.S. social trends for the next 25 years.

When the sex ratio is low (too many women), women are more slender; when women are in short supply, as was the case in the United States in the 1950s, women are more curvaceous, perhaps because they are trying to look the part of traditional wife and mother. Barber’s studies, which often look at patterns in 40 countries or more, have shown the power of the sex ratio in predicting such things as the rate of nonmarital births, the practice of polygyny, and even the likelihood that men will grow facial hair. The more men there are, he found, the more hair they grow to attract mates.

When there is an excess of available men—as was true during most of U.S. history because most immigrants are male—marriage is generally revered and values are conservative. When available women outnumber available men, women are set free of the home, and values shift toward liberalism. But a low sex ratio also lowers the living standards of women and causes turmoil in relationships, mainly because men typically have more power in society, which they tend to exercise crudely when there are extra women around.


Feminism Has Always Existed in Africa

In much of pre-modern Africa, there were women who possessed economic, political and spiritual power. To name only a few there were warrior women like the Amazons or Fon women of Dahomey. Or royalty who used their powers to demand justice like Makeda of Ethiopia, Nzinga of Angola or Mnkabayi of Zululand.

However, it is also true that women who weren’t lucky to be born into spiritually empowered clans or who weren’t wealthy traders or chiefly women, would face subjugation due to their gender.

The term ‘feminism’ in Africa is obviously an import just like every other English or French or Portuguese term is. However, the feministic concept is not an import in the very slightest. They didn’t always call it feminism (the noun) but there have always been women who were feminist (the adjective).


Men Are Obsolete

Men, as we’ve historically come to define them, are obsolete.  Obsolete does not mean worthless. It means outmoded.

ONE: It’s the end of men because men are failing in the workplace.

  • Over the last few decades men’s incomes have been slowly declining and women’s have been rising.
  • In 2009 they became the majority of the American workforce for the first time ever.
  • In nearly every country, on all but one continent, women are getting 60 percent of college degrees

TWO: It’s the end of men because the traditional household, propped up by the male breadwinner, is vanishing.

  • We have a new global type, for example, called the alpha wife, a woman who makes more money than her husband or boyfriend.

THREE: It’s the end of men because we can see it in the working and middle class.

  • The working class feels the end of men the most, as men lose their jobs and lose their will to be fathers, and women do everything alone, creating a virtual matriarchy in the parts of the country that used to be bastions of machismo.  As many a woman told me, “He’d be just another mouth to feed.”

FOUR: It’s the end of men because men have lost their monopoly on violence and aggression.

  • Women are becoming more sexually confident, and are going to war and going to jail more.

FIVE: It’s the end of men because men, too, are now obsessed with their body hair.

FROM:   Men Are Obsolete | TIME.com http://ideas.time.com/2014/01/02/men-are-obsolete/#ixzz2pSKSCG9C


Black Fathers Are Better Fathers: National Center for Health Statistics

A federal survey of American parents shows that Black fathers who live with their children are just as involved as other dads — or more so.  The report also revealed that among American fathers living apart from their children, Black dads were equally or more involved than other dads, according to most measures.

The report was based on a federal survey that included more than 3,900 fathers between 2006 and 2010 — a trove of data seen as the gold standard for studying fatherhood in the United States.

For instance, among fathers who lived with young children, 70% of Black dads said they bathed, diapered or dressed those kids every day, compared with 60% of White fathers and 45% of Latino fathers.

Nearly 35% of Black fathers who lived with their young children said they read to them daily, compared with 30% of White dads and 22% of Latino dads.

Worry about Black fathers has been tied to a persistent fact: Black dads are especially likely to live apart from one or more of their children — and fathers of all races tend to be less involved in the day-to-day lives of their kids when they live elsewhere.

Yet the report also revealed that among American fathers living apart from their children, Black dads were at least as involved as other dads not living with their kids, or more so, according to most measures. Among fathers living apart from older children, more than half of Black fathers said that several times a week or more, they talked to their kids about their day — a higher percentage than among white or Latino dads living separately from older children, the report showed.

Nearly half of Black fathers living apart from their young children said they played with them at least several times a week, 42% said they fed or ate with them that frequently, and 41% said they bathed, diapered or helped dress them as often — rates on par with or higher than those of other men living apart from their kids.

Earlier research has shown that after parents break up, fathers become less involved as time passes. Mothers may curb the time they allow an ex to spend with their children. Fathers sometimes struggle to stay as involved if they form another family.

However, Laura Tach and fellow researchers also found that Black fathers were more likely than White or Latino dads to stay close to their children after having more kids with a new partner. Because it isn’t as rare for Black fathers to live away from the home, their communities might have stronger expectations that fathers will stay involved outside the “package deal” of a wife and kids, explained Tach, a professor of policy analysis at Cornell University.

“Some men think when they lose a marriage, they lose the relationship with the kids,” said Marquette University sociology professor Roberta L. Coles. “For Black men that doesn’t seem to be as true.”

In many cases, the differences between Black fathers and those of other races were not statistically significant, researchers said.


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Six Reasons to Have Six Kids

When people hear that I have six kids, the reaction is usually entertaining. Sure, there are some days when I wonder what I’ve gotten myself into, worry about the world they’ll inherit, and/or consider the environmental footprint of a family like mine.

But most of the time I just celebrate how awesome it is to have six kids. Here are a few reasons why: READ MORE…